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>1LACHUk COUNFY 

Department ot 
Planning & DeNelopment 








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ATION 
>1ND 

DPEi^SPACE 




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RESOLUTION 84- 24 

A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, 
FLORIDA, ADOPTING THE REVISION TO THE 
RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE ELEMENT OF 
THE ALACHUA COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE 
PLAN; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. 

WHEREAS, in 1977, the Board of County Commissioners of 
Alachua County adopted a recreation and open space element as a 
part of the comprehensive development plan to provide for the 
County's future growth; and, 

WHEREAS, the Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act 
mandates that the County periodically evaluate and appraise its 
Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board recognizes that planning should be a 
continuous and ongoing process; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the 
report of the Alachua County Local Planning Agency, entitled "Pro- 
posed Recreation and Open Space Element of the Alachua County Com- 
prehensive Plan", with recommended revisions to the Recreation and 
Open Space Element of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the writ- 
ten comments of the state land planning agency and the regional 
planning agency in regard to revisions to the Recreation and Open 
Space Element of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the 
recommendations of the Alachua County Department of Planning and 
Development with regard to revisions to the Recreation and Open 
Space Element of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has held duly noticed public hearings 
for the purpose of providing public participation in the evalua- 
tion and revision of the Recreation and Open Space Element of the 
Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; and. 



WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the writ- 
ten and oral comments of the public in regard to amending the 
Recreation and Open Space Element of the Alachua County Comprehen- 
sive Plan; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA: 

1 . That the Board of County Commissioners of Alachua 
County does hereby adopt the revision to the Recreation and Open 
Space Element of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan whicn is 
attached hereto and made a part hereof by reference. 

2. The revised Recreation and Open Space Element of the 
Alachua County Comprehensive Plan shall become effective on the 
day of , A.D., 1984. 

DULY ADOPTED in special session, this 13th day of 
March, A.D., 1984. 

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF 
ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA 




Thomas Coward, Chairman 
ATTEST: . ^'"^ 



A. Curtis Powers, Clerk 



(SEAL) 



RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE ELMENT 

OP THE 
ALACHUA COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 



ALACHUA COUNTY 
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



EFFECTIVE 
AUGUST 1, 1984 



E 

1. 
1, 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



LIST OP PiaURES AND TABLES ii 

INTRODUCTION 1 

BASIC PRINCIPLES 2 

Proper Level of Public Services 3 

Environmental Quality 14 

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 21 

RELATIONSHIPS TO OTHER PLAN ELEMENTS 22 

GENEE^AL RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE POLICIES 24 

RECREATION POLICIES 27 

OPEN SPACE POLICIES 29 

APPENDIX A - Urban Area Resource Based Recreational Site Inventory 31 

APPENDIX B - Rural Area Resource Based Recreational Site Inventory 38 

APPENDIX C - Urban Area User-Oriented FACILITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT 47 

APPENDIX D - Open Space Inventory 52 

APPENDIX E - Lake Inventory 55 

APPENDIX P - Additional Recreational and Open Space Facilities 57 

APPENDIX G - Example Park Site Plans 58 

GLOSSARY 62 



LIST OF FIGURES 

Figure Page 

A Resource-Based Recreation 6 

B User-Oriented Recreation 6 

C Urban Area Recreational Sites 7 

D Rural Area Recreational Sites 8 

E Recreational Service Areas 9 

P Urban Area Open Space 18 

Or Rural Area Open Space 20 

H Alachua County Lakes 56 

I Nei^borhood Park 58 

J Camnunity Park 59 

K Urban District Park 60 

L Regional Park 61 



LIST OF TABLES 
Table Page 

1 Alachua County Park Classification System 3 

2 User-Oriented Recreational Facility Standards 4 

3 Regional Park Acreage Needs Assessment 10 

4 Urban-District Park Acreage Needs Assessment 11 

5 1 985 and 2000 Community Park Acreage 12 

6 1 985 and 2000 Nei^borhood Park Acreage 13 



11 



INTRODUCTION 

Recreational activities and open space are amenities of life v^ich all 
Alachua County residents should experience and enjoy. The primary 
responsibility for the provision of these amenities throughout the county is 
shouldered by the various state and local governmental entities. 

The unincorporated areas of Alachua County have experienced substantial 
growth in recent years, and this trend is expected to accelerate in the near 
future. As these areas grow, the demand for recreational facilities and open 
space will increase. In order to maintain a high quality of life for all 
present and future residents of the unincorporated areas, the County should be 
responsible for providing the prc^)er level of recreational facilities and open 
space in the most cost effective manner. 

TRENDS INFLUENCING RECREATION 

Four emerging trends will directly influence the future provision of 
recreational facilities within Alachua County. These trends are as follows: 

1. Increasing Population 

2. Increasing Residential Densities 

3. Increasing Leisure Time 

4. Increasing Energy Costs 

First, it is projected that the population of the unincorporated areas of 
the County will more than double by the year 2000. ■'■ Barring any annexation 
by the several municipalities, the County will be responsible for the provision 
of recreational sites for this burgeoning population. 

Second, the continuing development of conpact or attached residential 

dwelling units will increase population densities and decrease private 

2 
recreational space, creating additional demand for public recreational sites. 

-1- 



Third, it is anticipated that leisure time in our society will continue to 
increase in the forseeable future. A direct result of this irK:rease in 
leisure time will be an increase in the demand for recreational facilities. 

Fourth, the projected long term trends of increasing energy costs will 
decrease the mobility of the general population. This will tend to increase 
the role of "local" parks in satisfying recreational needs. 

The increasing cost of energy will also decrease the demand for energy 
intensive recreational activities (e.g. power boating, trail bike riding, water 
skiing) , while it will increase the demand for energy efficient activities 
(e.g. bicycling, swimming, canoeing).^ 

These trends and their effects on the provision of recreational facilities 
in the unincorporated areas of Alachua County will result in: 

1) more people demanding recreational facilities; 

2) more leisure time spent on recreational activities; 

3) more demand placed on park sites in close proximity to 
population concentrations; and 

4) more demand placed on energy efficient recreational activities. 

BASIC PRINCIPLES 

Recreational and open space development can be evaluated in light of 
selected basic principles of the Ccmprehensive Plan. 

1) All residents are provided with the proper level of piblic 
services ; 

2) The recognition of existing residential neighborhoods as a collective 
vested interest for all residents of the County; and 

3) Ihe fragile environmental quality of North Florida is not 
significantly altered. 



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Proper Level of Public^Services _ (Basic Principle #1 ) 

Recreational facilities are an inportant attribute of any residential area. 
The facilities provide open space, the opportunity for human physical 
developrent, and a means for social interactic«i within or among neighborhoods. 
All present and future residents of Alachua County should be provided with the 
proper level of publicly accessible recreatic«ial facilities. 

Park Classificaticn Syston 

Parks in Alachua County range in size from approximately 0.2 to thousands 
of acres. Accordingly, these parks differ in the general facilities provided, 
the extent of service areas, and the levels of population served (see Table 1). 



Table 1 









ALACHUA COUNTY 












PARK CLASSIFICATION SYSTai 










TYPICAL 


TYPICAL 


RECOkWENDED 


TYPICAL SIZE 


RECOfcWENDED 


FACILITY TYPE 


LOCATION/SETTING 


SERVICE AREA» 


POPUUTION SERVED 


AREA STANDARD 


(ACRES) 


FACILITIES 




INTRA-URBAN 


lA MILE 


UP TO 2500 


NOT 


UP TO 


BOTH PASSIVE AND 


MINI-PARK 




RADIUS 
(SUB- 
NEIGHBORHOOD) 




APPLICABLE 


5 ACRES 


ACTIVE USER 
ORIENTED 
RECREATIONAL 
FACILITIES 




INTRA-URBAN, 










DOTH PASSIVE AND 


NEIGHBORHOOD 


RESIDENTIAL, 


1/2 MILE 


UP TO 10,000 


2 ACRES/ 


5-20 


ACTIVE USER - 




ADJACENT TO 


RADIUS 




1000 POP 


ACRES 


ORIENTED 


PARK 


ELEM-NTARY SCHOOL 
WHEN POSSIBLE 




« 






RECREATIONAL 
FACILITIES 
ADAPTED TO NEEDS 
OF NEIGHBORHOOD 




IHTRA-URBAN 










BOTH PASSIVE AND 




ACCESSIBLE TO 


3 MILE 


UP TO 50,000 


2 ACRKT./ 


20- J 00 


ACTIVE USER- 


COf«.lUNITY 


A -6 NEIGHBORHOODS, 


RADIUS 




1000 POP 


ACRES 


ORIENTED 


PARK 


ADJACENT TO 
raDDLE/HIGH SCHOOL 
WHEN POSSIBLE 










RECREATIONAL 
FACILITIES. 














BALANCE OF RTSOURCE 














BASED AND USER- 


URBAN-DISTRICT 


INTRA-URBAN 


4.0 MINUTES 


IN EXCESS 


5 ACRES/ 


100+ 


ORIENTED 


PARK 


OR 


DRIVING 




1000 POP 


ACPXS 


RECREATIONAL 




URBAN PERIPHERY 


DISTANCE 


OF 50,000 






FACILITIES 














IRIMARII.v RKXDUHCE 


REGIONAL 


URBAN PERIPHERY 


1 HOUR 


IN EXCESS 


20 ACRr;;/ 


250 ♦ 


HAr-KD riKCHEATIONAL 


PARK 


OR 


DRIVING 








FACILITIES. 




RURAL 


DISTANCE 


OF 100,000 


1000 POP 


ACRES 






•SERVICE AREAS AP 


PLICABLE TO URIU 


iN AREA ONLY. 









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Recreational Facility Standards 



Recreational facilities are classified generally as either resource-based 
or user-oriented (see Figures A and B) . Population standards are not 
applicable to resource-based recreational facilties, v»^ich are dependent on the 
amenities of the natural environment. General population standards for user- 
oriented recreational facilities, in contrast, are readily applicable (see 
Table 2). 

TABLE 2 



USERHDRIENTED 


RECREATIOI«U. FACILITY STANEARDS 


Facility 
County Concern 


Population Standard 




Baseball Fields 


1/20,000 


Fri^ee Golf 


with community park 


Jogging/Exercise Trails 


with county owned community park 


Multi-purpose Courts 


1/1500 


Mult i -Purpose Fields 


1/3500 


Multi-Purpose Walled Courts 


1/2000 


Picnic Tables 


1/500 


Playgrounds 


.25 acres neighborhood park 




.35 acres comnunity park 


Softball Aittle League Fields 


1/3000 


Tennis Courts 


1/2000 


Track and Field 


with middle and high schools 


Spectator Facilities 


with appropriate facilities 


Outdoor Theater 


with urban district park 


Municipal Concern 




Recreation Centers (Neighborhood) 


1/10,000 


Recreation Centers (Community) 


1/20,000 


Shuffleboard Courts 


1/2500 


Swimming Pool (25 yard) 


1/10,000 


Swimming Pool (50 yard) 


1/20,000 



Recreational Site Inventory 
The existing publicly accessible resource -based and user-oriented 
recreational sites servicing the unincorporated areas of Alachua County were 
inventoried (see Appendices A and B). The locations of these sites are 
numerically identified in Figures C and D. 



The resourceHDased site inventories provide a listing of site location 
characteristics v*iich fit the definition of resource based recreation. They 
are not used to fulfill population standards based on acres/person. Policies 
contained in Section 2.2 should be used to guide decisions for development and 
location of these facilities. 



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Figure A 
RESOURCE-BASED RECREATION 




Resource-based recreation is any recreational activity v^ere location is 
depaidoit on sone particular element or caribinaticai of elements in the 
natural environment. 



Figure B 
USER-ORIENTED RECREATKM 











User-oriented recreaticai is any recreational activity that can be provided 
almost anywhere for the convenience of the user. 




'■■■> W W ^ 



t- 




FIGURED -RURAL AREA RECREATIONAL SITES 



Recreational Service Areas 

As is indicated in Table 1, different class if i<:aticaTs of parks have 
different radii of service areas. Figure E displays this service area concept 
for cannunity and neighborhood parks in the unincorporated pxDrtions of the 
Gainesville Urban Area. 




»Ta«E- RECREATIONAL SERVICE AREAS 



KEY 



• Neighborhood Park 

• Community Park 



Neighborhood Park Service Area 
^^ Community Park Service Area 



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Acreage Needs Assessment 

Acquis iticai of land is the first step in the implementation of any 
recreaticaial program. The determination of the appropriate timing and location 
of new park sites depends on the existing park inventory and the scale and 
distributicai of projected population growth. Utilizing population projections 
through the year 2000, park acreage standards (Table 1) are applied to project 
the anDunt and spatial distribution of land required to meet the recreaticxial 
objectives of the county. Each park classification has different standards and 
will be considered separately. Exartples of typical site plans for each park 
classificaticn are presented in Appendix G. 

Regional Parks 



North Central Florida is blessed vith a very rich and beautiful natural 
environment, and there are tens of thousands of acres dedicated to resource- 
based recreation. Alachua County alone currently has wore than 27,000 acres of 
land in regional parks, far in excess of the recommended standard acreage 
through the year 2000 (see Table 3). 

TABLE 3 





REGIONAL PARK ACREAGE NEEDS ASSESSMEbTT 






( Standard 


- 20 Acres /lOOO People) 






Year 
1985 


Projected 
Population* 

174,651 


Proposed Acreage 
By 1985 


Existing Acreage 
in 1983 

27,314 


Deficit 
Acreage 




3493.0 


1990 


197,932 


3958.6 




27,314 





1995 


221,224 


4424.5 




27,314 





2000 


244,516 


4890.3 




27,314 







*projected population 


for 


all Alachua 


County 



10- 



Urban District Par^s 

There are no urban-district parks in Aladiua Ccunty as of 1983. It is 
projected that more than 800 acres of urban-district parkland will be needed in 
the urban area by the year 2000 ( see Table 4 ) . The Lake Kanapaha area is 
suitable for development as an urban-district park in the near future, but an 
additicxial site may be needed. 



TABLE 4 



URBAN-DlSTRiCr PARK ACKKALJE NHIUDS ASSESSMhINT 
(Standard-5 acres/1000 people) 


Yf^ar 
1985 


Projected 
Pcpulatica-i* 

130,450 




Proposed 
Acreage 

652.3 


Existing Acreage 
in 1983 


Deficit 
Acreage 

-652.3 







1990 


145,038 




725.2 







-725.2 


1995 


161,096 




805.5 







-805.5 


2000 


177,149 




885.7 







-885 . 7 




♦projected population for 


Gainesville Urban 


Area 





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Cannunity Parks 

The need for ccrnnunity park acreage is dependent upcn the distribution of 
population ty planning districts. Table 5 identifies the ccxnnunity park 
planning districts and projects the need for comnanity park acreage for the 
years 1985 and 2000. 



TABLE 5 

1985 AND 2000 OOMMUNITY PARK ACREAGE 

NEEDS ASSESSMEOT 

(Standard - 2 acres/1000 people) 



1985 




1985 




1983 




Camunity Park 
Planning Districts 




Estinated 


Cunulative 


Existing 


Deficit 




Papulation 


Acreage Needed 


Acreage 


Acreage 2 


Urban 












East (PD 12, 13) 




7,544 


15.1 


20 


- 


PD 14 




13,898 


27.8 


- 


27.8 


PD 15 




8,742 


17.5 


- 


17.5 


Ncrtlwest (PD 16, 18, 


19) 


13,975 


28.0 


77.7 
43.1^ 


- 


North (PD 17, 20) 




2,312 


4.6 


- 


Rural 












PD 21 




14,995 


30.0 


90 


- 


PD 22 




6,712 


13.4 


- 


13.4 


PD 23 




5,774 


11.5 


38.5 


- 


PD 24 




2,795 


5.6 


- 


5.6 


PD 25 




13,925 


27.9 


58.0 




TOTAL 




90,762 


181.4 


284.2 


68.9 


2000 




2000 




1983 




Camunity Park 
Planning Districts 




Estimated 


Cumalative 


Existing 


Deficit 




Population 


Acreage Needed 


Acreage 


Acreage ^ 


Urban 












East (PD 12, 13) 




11,215 


22.4 


20 


- 


PD 14 




19,552 


39.1 


- 


39.1 


PD 15 




16,627 


33.3 


- 


33.3 


Northwest (PD 16, 18, 


19) 


22,706 


45.4 


43. 1^ 


- 


North (PD 17, 20) 




4,982 


10.0 


- 


Rured. 












PD 21 




22,725 


45.5 


90 


- 


PD 22 




10,345 


20.7 


- 


20.7 


PD 23 




8,677 


17.4 


38.5 


- 


PD 24 




4,190 


8.4 


- 


8.4 


PD 25 




21,429 


42.9 


58.0 


- 


TOTAL 




142,448 


285.1 


284.2 


113.9 


^Selected contiguous urban planning 


districts are cortjined to increase 1 


population thresholds 


and to reflect the three mile 


comainity park | 


service radius. 












Deficit acreage of 


20 


acres or greater indicates the 


> need for 


a 


ocimunity park. P 


lanning for such 


parks should begin as the deficit | 


acreage approaches 


20 


acres. 








^County-owned Northside 


Paik is considered with the North Conrunity Park 1 


Planning District 


although it is actually located within the City of | 


Gainesville. 













-12' 



Neigh3x>rhood 



Parks 



The need for nei«ghborhood park acreage is also dependent upcxi the 
distribution of population by planning districts. Table 6 identifies the 
County planning districts and projects the need for neighborhood park acreage 
for the years 1985 and 2000. 







TART.K 


6 








1985 AND 2000 NEIOfflORHOOD PARK ACREAGE NEEDS 


ASSESSMENT 








(Standard - 2 acres/1000 people) 










1985 




1983 








Estijieted 


Cunulative 


Existing 
Acreage 


Deficit 




ro 


Population 


Acreage Needed 


Acreage^ 


URBAN 


12 


3,467 


6.9 


16 


- 




13 


4,077 


8.2 


10 


- 




14 


13,898 


27.8 


9 


18.8 




15 


8,742 


17.5 


- 


17.5 




16 


5,340 


10.7 


10 


0.7 




17 


812 


1.6 


- 


1.6 




18 


6,316 


12.6 


38.9 


- 




19 


2,319 


4.6 


- 


4.6 




20 


1,500 


3.0 


- 


3.0 


RJRAL 


21 


14,995 


30.0 


61.3 


- 




22 


6,712 


13.4 


15.7 


- 




23 


5,774 


11.5 


10.6 


0.9 


- 


24 


2,795 


5.6 


6.8 


- 


TOTAL 


25 


13,925 
90,672 


27.9 
181.3 


41.4 
219.7 


- 


59.7 






2000 




1983 








Estimated 


Cunulative 


Existing 
Acreage 


Deficit- 
Acreage 




PD 


Population 


Acreage Needed 


URBAN 


12 


4,868 


9.7 


16 


_ 




13 


6,347 


12.7 


10 


2.7 




14 


19,552 


39.1 


9 


30.1 




15 


16,627 


33.3 


- 


33.3 




16 


9,212 


18.4 


10 


8.4 




17 


1,674 


3.3 


- 


3.3 




18 


9,377 


18.7 


38.9 


- 




19 


4,117 


8.2 


- 


8.2 




20 


3,308 


6.6 


- 


6.6 


FURAL 


21 


22,725 


45.5 


61.3 


_ 




22 


10,345 


20.7 


15.7 


5.0 




23 


8,677 


17.4 


10.6 


6.8 




24 


4,190 


8.4 


6.8 


1.6 




25 


21,429 


42.9 


41.4 


1.5 


TOTAL 




142,428 


284.9 


219.7 


126.2 




Includes 


mini park acreage in 


rural planning districts. 






Deficit 


acreage of 5 acres or 


greater indicates the need 


for a 




neighborhcxxi park. 









-13- 



User-Oriented Facility Needs Assessment 
Future recreational facility needs can be determined by applying the 
projected population groArth for the county with the facility standards outlined 
in Table 2. The facility needs assessment indicates that all fourteen planning 
districts will need seme degree of user-oriented recreaticaial facility 
development by the year 2000 (see Ajpendix C). Within the GUA, Planning 
Districts 14 and 15 are in need of the most facilities. In the rural areas of 
the county. Planning Districts 22 and 25 are in need of the most facilities. 



Environmental Quality (Basic Principle #3) 

The ability of the residents of Alachua County to participate and interact 
with the natural envirconent is inherent in the availability of leisure time 
and the distribution of open space opportunities. An adequate open space 
program is not expected to meet all of the needs of ' leisure ' , but it 
ccaistitutes a vital elenent in maintaining a high quality of life and a 
positive perceptiai of Alachua County as a coinainity. In addition, the 
protection of open space plays an inportant role in noise and pollution 
abatonent, control of floods and erosion, preservation of wildlife, and the 
amelioration of micro-climatic conditions of temperature and humidity. 

Forests and woodlands, flood plain areas, agricultural land, and 
developed user-oriented recreational facilities all serve as part of an open 
space system. The individual elements themselves have functic»is to perform, 
but it is the coniDined system of parks, buffers, and linkages that shape the 
urbanized landscape. 



-14- 



C^n Space Classifixiation System 

The many different fonns of open space may be classified according to the 
functional use of the land. They can be defined by describing the function of 
the space with respect to surrounding land uses as well as the actual use on 
the site. Many lands designated for open space will be stbject to more than 
one use. The classification system described here is used to categorize 
existing open space and to project needed iirprovements in the open space system 
in the Gainesville Urban Area (GtE\).° There are four major types of open 
space: 

Utility Open Space 
Green Open Space 
Corridor Open Space 
Multi Use Open Space 

Utility Open Space 

The identification of utility open space is based primarily on the 
productive capacity of the land and on its ability to be utilized for 
production and storage. The following types of land are considered utility 
open space: 

Resource Lands - includes forests, grazing land, mining 

land, agricultural land, wetlands, 
lakes, and rivers used for water storage 
supply. 

Flood Control and Drainage - land that is normally not suitable for 

construction. These include flood 
plains, aquifer recharge areas, and 
drainage ways (streams, ditches, creeks 
or other paths for normal runoff) . 

Reserves and Preserves - land that is set aside for future 

resource use. These include forests not 
managed for tiirber or recreation. 



-15- 



Green Open Space 

These lands are the most ccmron open space as perceived ty the average 
citizen. Their primary role is to provide resource-based and user-oriented 
recreatiOTial opportunities. The following types of land are considered green 



open spaces: 



Protected Areas - 



Urban Park Areas - 



Urban Developirent Open Space - 



land that has limited access due to the 
protection of the site's scenic or 
natural resource value. These include 
scenic areas, geological sites, cultural 
or historical sites, regional parks, and 
forests . 

parks oriented to the urban pcpulaticxi 
for origin of users as well as for 
location. These include zoos, botanical 
gardens, fairgrounds, and an^i theaters, 
as well as traditional user-oriented 
recreational sites. Those spaces that 
are available to only a portion of the 
populaticxi sudi as private clubs with 
recreational facilities are also 
included in an open space systan. 

provides for the relief of develoFment 
intensity. These may take the form of 
plcinned greenbelts, 'pocket' greenspace, 
buffers between ccaiflicting land uses, 
plazas, and pedestrian nails. 



Corridor Open Space 

These lands are used for the movement of people involved in leisure time 
activities. These spaces can serve as the linkage between residential areas, 
recreational facilities, shopping facilities, or any combination of these 
uses. They Ccin assist in the everyday circulation of non-^rotorized vehicles, 
but their primary purpose is to provide for movement in a leisure time 
ooitext. Exanples of this type of open space are: 



Ri^ts-of-Way Spaces - 



includes streets, rivers, railroad 
corridors, and utility and drainage 
easements . 



-16- 



Scenic and Environmental Corridors - corridors that are detennined to have 

unique scenic or envircximental features. 



Multi-Use Open Space 

The majority of open space is not devoted to just cxie use. Instead, 
several uses may occur on one site that can either ccnpete with or ccrplement 
eadh other. Lakes used for water storage may corrpete with other resource-based 
activities such as water-skiing and boating, or bikeways may occur concurrently 
with transmission lines on utility easements. The multi-use of open space land 
should be encouraged provided that no one use precludes another use. 

Open Space Inventory 

As portions of Alachua County change f rem a sparsely developed landscape to 
a more intense urban system, the need to protect the present and future open 
space system will be paramount to preserving a high quality of life. 

Much of the existing open space system has evolved without the benefit of 
an overall scheme. For exanple, the siting of railroad tracks and electric 
transraissicn lines occurred long before planning for open space was in the 
cc«iscious mind of the ccimunity. 

All four major types of open space occur in the unincorporated Gainesville 
Urban Area. These sites cire depicted in Figure F and listed in Appendix D. 
The rural landscape, by its very nature, is cpen and not experiencing urbcin 
type growth. The classificaticai of cpen space in the rural portions of the 
county is less dynamic due to the differing green space needs. For exanple, in 
the urban eurea, transmissiai line corridors and drainage ditches serve a 



-17- 




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function of separating urban land uses. Hcwever, in the rural area, 
transmission lines and drainage ditches are viewed as intrusions to the cpen, 
less intensely developed rural landscape. The majority of the rural area is 
used as resource lands: forests, grazing land, cropland, and lakes. These 
will not be inventoried because they are considered inherent to the rural 
landscape (see Figure G euid Appendix D) . 

Open Space Meeds Assessment 

Unlike developed recreational sites such as neighborhood and conmunity parks, 
open space sites do not lend themselves to population standards. However, the 
following assunpticxis cein be made: 



1) Areas developed at higher residential densities and land use 
intensities require more intermittent open space than lower 
intensity areas. 

2) It is often not "how much" open space can be acquire<'i but "where 
can open space be found?" 

3) The pressures for acquisition of cpen space are greater in 
rapidly developing "inlying" areas as opposed to suburban areas 
undergoing slow transition. 

4) Flood control and drainage patterns will serve as the framework 
for an open space system because their development is costly and 
restricted by flood plain regulations. 

The general areas which will require open space for the relief of development 
intensity in the urban area are depicted in Figure F and listed in Appendix D. 
As these areas cc«ritinue to develop, ccxisideration should be given to the 
acquisition of some type of open space. 



-19- 




na«EQ- RURAL AREA OPEN SPACE 



•20- 



GOAL AND OBJECT IVES 

A goal and set of objectives must be established to serve as the basis for 
the development of a future recreation and cpen space system. The policies and 
standards contained in this document represent further refinements of the goal 
and objectives listed belcw: 



GOAL: TO PROVIDE FOR A WIDE RANGE OF RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND OPEN 
SPACE TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY 



OBJECTIVES: 



1) Encourage diversity of recreational opportunities. 



2) Encourage the public use of existing resource-based 
or user-oriented recreational facilities. 



3) Protect, enhance, and develop natural amenities 
which have resource-based recreational potential. 



4) Provide for additional user-orientec^ recreational 
facilities to satisfy the denvamis of the county's 
increasing population. 



5) Plan open space for relief fron development intensity. 



6) Enccurage the provision of open space within all 
types of urban and rural development. 



7) Protect sensitive open space fron the encroachment 
inccrpatible development. 



-21- 



RELATIONSHIPS TO OTHER PLAN ELEMENTS 

-The Future Land Use^ Elenent establishes policies and standards for the 
proper distribution of varying land uses. The Residential Density 
Checklist encourages sli<^tly higher residential densities near 
recreational sites. The policies identified encourage the use of open 
space to separate differing land uses. 

-The Traffic Circulati on Element projects the needed roadvay infrastructure 
for the anticipated grcwth of the county. Access to recreational sites is 
a primary ccaicem for the irtplementation of recreational and open space 
policies. 

-The Mass Transi t Element identifies the various modes of intraurban 
transportaticxi. Comunity and urban-district parks should be located on 
mass transit routes so that the facilities are accessible to all 
residents of the ccmnunity. 

-The Sanitary Se v er E lei nent projects future needs and establishes policies 
for the provision of sewage collection and treatJiient facilities. Public 
recreation or open space can be planned to conplonent a wastewater 
treatment site in order to maximize the use of the public's investment. 

-The Solid Waste E l ement projects the future demand for landfilling and 
other alternative forms of waste disposal. Very often restored landfill 
sites are appropriate for recreational or open space (Jevelqpment . 

-The Drainage Element identifies the general drainage patterns for the 
entire county. This information influences the proper siting of both user- 



■22- 



oriented and resource-based recreational facilities. Natural and man-made 
drainage patterns Ccin serve as corridor open space linking or separating 
urban land uses. 

-The Potab le Water Element establishes guidelines for the provision of 
water to the contnunity. The quality and quantity of that water can be 
influenced by the development activities on or around sources of potable 
water. Recreation and open space sites often coincide with prime aquifer 
recharge areas to preserve environmental quality. 

-The ConseryatiOTi^ El ement identifies those cireas where the protection of 
natural resources is vital to the environmental quality of the county. 
Recreational and cpen space utilization of these sensitive areas can 

enhance the public's a^reciation of the landscape while protecting vital 

resources. 

-The Housing Element projects the future ntiix of housing types. Information 
concerning the distributicxi of various housing types can aid in the 
projection of recreational facilities and open space needs far in advance 
of land develofxnent . 

-The Intergovernment al Coo rdinati o n E lement pronotes cooperation between 
governmental entities in Alachua County. When fiscal resources are 
scarce, joint efforts between governmental entities can provide vital 
recreational facilities for the comntunity at large. 

-The Utility element establishes policies for the generation and 
distribution of electrical power. Overhead transmission line corridors 
can serve as the linkage between open space and user-oriented recreational 
facilities. «« 



1.0 GENERAL RECREATION AND OPEN SI«^CE POLICIES 



1.1 GENEf^L 

The County will promote and support the development of a 
recreation and open space program in accordance with the policies 
and guidelines outlined in this Recreation and Open Space 
Element. The County's primary role shall be the acquisition of 
land to be devoted to recreational and open space develojMnent. 
Initial phasing of urban park development will include minimal 
program intensive inprovements. Conpletion of park development 
should occur after annexation by one of the County's 
municipalities. 

1.1.1 A conceptual plan for park and recreational facility design and 
location should be adopted by the Board of County Commissioners, 
which includes both short and long range development proposals 
for all County recreational and open space areas. 

1.1.2 Natural barriers, such as steeply slewing ridges, sinkhole areas, 
stream flood plains, and other areas unsuitable for urban 
development, shall be used, whenever possible, as natural 
dividers between neighborhoods and retained as recreational or 
open space areas. 

1.1.3 Recreational and open space land uses should implement the urban 
cluster concept. However, potential sites outside urban clusters 
are acceptable where they would provide access to the unique 
natural environment. 

1.1.4 Recreational development and open space areas should be 
encouraged to coincide with the protection of aquifer recharge 
areas. 



1.1.5 Recreational and open space areas should be utilized to separate 
incompatible land uses. 

All developed County park sites shall be accessible to the 
general population. 

A system of bikeways, footpaths, and nature trails should be 
developed to link residential, recreational, and open space 
areas. Such systems should make appropriate use of open space 
along open space corridors and streams. 

1.1.8 Where practical, bikepaths and pedestrian walkways should be 
provided as part of any site plan for park and recreational 
facilities. 




1.1.9 The use of innovative site design eind development techniques 
should be encouraged in order to maximize the provision of 
usable recreational and open space areas. 



■24- 



1.1.10 Native vegetation should be used in landscaping recreational 
lands or open space to reflect the natural surroundings and to 
reduce maintenance costs. 

1.1.11 The Residential Checklist in the Future Land Use Element is 
designed to encourage private land contributions to the County 
park system. In exchange for a contribution, a greater nuntoer of 
residential density points can be attained. Ho'^\^ver, no points 
shall be awarded unless the proposed site is within an area 
identified in this Recreation and Open Space Element in need of 
additional recreational land. 

1.1.12 All development proposals in unincorporated areas should be 
reviewed to assess their impacts on present or proposed 
recreational or open space areas designated in the Recreation and 
Open Space Element. 

1.2 OOORDII^TIQN 

1.2.1 The County should work with the several municipalities, the 
Alachua County School Board, adjai::ent counties, and the State of 
Florida, and other providers of recreational services to 
coordinate all park and recreational plans to avoid duplication 
and conflicts. 

1.2.2 The County should consider interlocal agreements with 
municipalities or adjacent counties to jointly fund existing or 
proposed parks and recreational facilities. 

1.2.3 The County should initiate a formal written agreement with the 
Alachua County School Board, Santa Fe Community College, and 
selected private schools for public access and use of 
recreational facilities at the respective locations. This 
agreement should attempt to: 

a. expand the range of site facilities to include a full range 
of park facilities (e.g. pre-school play areas, picnic 
areas, and multi-purpose walled courts); 

b. allow expanded general public use of selected facilities 
during school hours; 

c. develop procedures for adding land area to an existing site 
where required; and 

d. share costs and responsibilities for security, insurance, 
liability, utility costs, and maintenance. 

1.2.4 The County should coordinate with the School Board on the 
location, phasing, and design of future school sites to enhance 
the potential of schools as recreational areas. 

1.2.5 The County, in conjunction with the School Board, shall determine 
the amount of expenditures, priority sites, and facilities to be 
developed on School Board property. The facility needs assessment 
should be utilized as a guideline for these decisions (See 
Appendix C) . 

-25- 



1.2.6 The County nay subsidize additional outdoor recreational 
development at School Board sites according to the recreational 
facility needs outlined in the facility needs assessment. 

1.3 Fltgg^CING 

1.3.1 The County will solicit available grants and loans from federal, 
state, and private sources which are instrumental in planning, 
acquiring, and developing parks, recreational facilities, and 
open space areas. 

1.3.2 The County may utilize all available financing iiiechanisms as 
local methods of financing capital expenditures for the 
acquisition, development, operation, and luaintenance of parks, 
recreational facilities, and open space areas. 

1.3.3 The County should encourage the establishment of municipal 
service taxing districts to finance and/or niaintain neighborhood 
recreational inprovenvents to serve residents in that area. 

1.3.4 The County shall utilize a five year capital improvements 
program as an incremental step toward accomplishing a long-range 
parks acquisition and development program. The capital 
improvements program shall be revised annually for consistency 
and conpatibility with the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan. 

1.4 lAND ^ACQUISITION 

1.4.1 The County will evaluate and determine the potential of its 
existing land holdings for future recreational and open space use. 

1.4.2 County owned lands should be developed with recreational 
facilities to the maximujn extent practical before realizing the 
need to purchase additional property for recreational development. 

1.4.3 Future recreational sites should be acquired or reserved in 
advance of new development for optimal locational advantage. 

1.4.4 Land parcels of a size or character that cannot be economically 
developed or irvaintained shall not be accepted for inclusion in 
the park system. 

1 . 5 DEV ELQPMEtfT RE)GUIATIQNS 

1.5.1 Designated parks, open space, and recreational areas should be 
protected from encroaching inconpatible land uses by utilizing 
landcaped buffering when appropriate. 

1.5.2 Criteria should be developed to determine the extent that new 
development increases the demand for parks and recreational 
services. The County should investigate methods by which new 
development can assume the cost of that demand. 



-26- 



2.0 RECREATION POLICIES 

2.1 GENERAL 

2.1.1 Recreational development should be ccwpatible with surrounding 
land uses and should be designed to minimize the inpacts of 
people on the sensitive natural environment. 

2.1.2 County park sites should be accessible by various modes of 
transportation, including bicycles, mass transit, and pedestrian. 

2.2 RESOURCE-B^SED RECREATION 

2.2.1 Development Priorities 

2.2.1.1 When economically feasible, the County should acquire and 
develop lands with resource-based recreational potential on 
a county-wide basis as the opportunities for acquisition 
arise. 

2.2.1.2 The County should attenpt to locate, acquire, and develc^ 
lands with resource-based recreational potential in areas in 
most need of such facilities. 

2.2.2 Park Location 

2.2.2.1 Appropriate resource-based recreational facilities should be 
established in conjunction with environmentally sensitive 
lands identified in the Conservation Element to prevent the 
possibility of detrimental development and to allow public 
access to environmentally scenic areas. 

2.2.2.2 The pitilic use of recreational water resources should be 
encouraged. The following measures should be taken to 
provide proper utilization of these resources: 

a. secure river, creek, and lake access sites through 
acquisition or easement; and 

b. designate canoe trails on appropriate river and creek 
segments. 

2.2.3 Park Accessibility 

2.2.3.1 Where access to resource-based sites is appropriate, it 
shall be provided to minimize the inpact on the unique 
character and quality of the area. 

2.3 USER-ORIENTED RECREJ^TION 

2.3.1 Development Priorities 

2.3.1.1 The general priorities for the ej^enditure of capital funds 
for the acquisition and develqpraent of user -oriented 
recreational lands and facilities should be assigned by the 
Board of County Commissioners on the following basis: 



-27- 



a. areas with existing population and existing 
recreational needs; 

b. areas with increasing population and projected future 
recreational needs; and 

c. areas with stable population and minimal recreational 
needs. 

2.3.1.2 The specific priorities for the expenditure of capital funds 
for the acquisition of user-oriented recreational lands and 
facilities should be determined by meeting the needs as 
outlined in the acreage and facility needs assessments. 

2.3.2 Park Location 

2.3.2.1 Development of neighborhood and community parks in close 
proximity to existing and proposed residential areas should 
be encouraged to ensure easy access and utilization by 
surrounding residents. 

2.3.2.2 Parks should be located on the periphery of established 
neighborhoods to facilitate access and to foster interaction 
between different neighborhoods. 

2.3.3 Park Accessibility 

2.3.3.1 Neighborhood parks should be located on local or collector 
streets. 

2.3.3.2 CcKnmunity parks should be located on collector streets or 
arterials. 

2.4 SITE PIANS 

2.4.1 Recreational sites located adjacent to arterials, railroad 
tracks, power lines or other inconpatible land uses should have 
proper screening and buffering to assure safety and aesthetic 
quality. 

2.4.2 Proposed site plans for user-oriented recreational parks shall 
designate and reserve areas for potential future development of 
municipal recreational facilities when needed (e.g. recreational 
centers, swimming pools). 

2.4.3 Citizen participation should be encouraged in all user-oriented 
recreational site plan decisions. In this regard, the planning 
staff should organize neighborhood or community meetings to 
solicit citizen input on proposed site plans for parks within the 
respective neighborhoods or communities. 

2.4.4 County parks shall be designed to accomodate the elderly and the 
handicapped users of recreational facilities. 



-28- 



3.0 OPEN SR^CE POLICIES 



3.1 GENERAL 

3.1.1 Both the pitolic and private provision of open space shall be 
encouraged in order to establish a basic land use pattern for the 
County's urban areas. 

3.1.2 The donation of land and easements for the provision of open 
space shall be encouraged. In rapidly developing high intensity 
areas, donations should be included as part of development 
proposals. 

3.1.3 The County shall continue to support, where appropriate, the 
efforts of private organizations to acquire and protect open 
space. 

3.1.4 Urban separators, in the form of open space or greerfoelts, shall 
be established between municipal urban areas to prevent the 
merging of urban areas and their consequent loss of identity. 
Rural residential, agriculture, conservation, and recreation 
shall be the only uses permitted between urban areas which are 
less than two miles apart. 

3.1.5 Criteria and methods shall be established for designating and 
' protecting wild and scenic areas identified in the Conservation 

Element. 

3.1.6 The following priorities should be utilized in determining public 
expenditures for open space acquisition: 

a. Environmentally endangered areas; 

b. Existing high intensity areas; ' 

c. R^idly developing high intensity areas; 

d. Non-developing low intensity areas; 

3.2 UTILITY OPEN SKVCE 

3.2.1 Access to utility open space should be encouraged as long as the 
environmental integrity, private property rights, and public 
safety are ensured. 

3.2.2 The continuation of agriculture should be encouraged because of 
its use as a viable form of open space. All development 
proposals in outlying areas should be reviewed for their impact 
on the supply of utility open space. 

3.2.3 In recognition of agriculture as viable open space and because of 
its value as a renewable resource, the County will seek to 
protect these unique areas from urban development. 



-29- 



3.2.4 The recreational use of resource lands such as lakes and forests, 
and flood control lands such as flood plains, should be 
encouraged provided that the environmental character of the open 
space is not damaged. 

3.3 GE^EN OPEN SB^CE 

3.3.1 Protected areas should be secured from encroachment of 
incoirpatible land uses. 

3.3.2 The provision of open space in urban developments should be 
encouraged through the use of incentives (such as density or 
intensity incentives) vrtiich also recognize constraints such as 
environmental inpact and the inpact on the capacity of services 
and facilities. 

3.4 (X)RRIDOR OPEN SB^CE 

3.4.1 Where possible, overhead transmission line corridors and other 
utility easements should be made available for bikepath, jogging 
trail, and bridle path development. This should be encouraged as 
the best off -roadway method of linking neighborhoods with other 
community facilities. 

3.4.2 Development along designated scenic roads shall not damage the 
visual quality of the corridor. 

3.4.3 Pifclic lands along streams should be incorporated into a trail 
system and protected from encroachment by incoirpatible uses. 
Establishment of a trail system should, however, give 
consideration to adjoining land uses and the County's ability to 
maintain and police such a system. 

3.5 MULTI-USE OPEN SP^CE 

3.5.1 The concurrent use of open space for recreational and other uses 
shall be encouraged vi^enever possible and when it is not damaging 
to the ecosystem. 

3.5.2 The County should coordinate efforts with the City of Gainesville 
in establishing a network of hiking, biking and exercise trails 
along the stream channels of the urban area. 



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(Q3AVd) 9NI>iyVd 



)i3Vb 313A3ia 



SNIiHOn 



S313Vid333y HSV^i 



S3H3N3a 



>nvM3ais 



S3Iini3\/d 313A3ia 



SS333V oinv 



3inoy sna 



N0Ii\/3I3ISS\/13 



(S3y3V) V3«V 



dIHSy3NM0 



Tj- ■rr 



^ 



(N 
<N 



TD 

8 8 



8 8 



SK K 



g 8 



8g s 

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8 




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a 



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siynoD nv9A3no; 



>i3vai: 



SibnOD SINN31! -" 



lOOd 9NIWWIMSI 



sai3ij 3n9\/3i 3iiin/nvaidOS! " 



Sibnoo aa\/oa3iddnHS| 



a3iN33 NOIlV3b03a| 



awnoasAVidi 



sianoD a3nvM 3sodbnd-inni-) 



501313 oiisiHiv 3S0dbnd-innk! 



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siynoD nvai3>isv9 


<N 


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CM 


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■ swooyiS3y 


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m 




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(a3AVd) 9NI>lbVd 


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g 



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Sai3Id 3Ii31HiV 3S0ddnd-IlinW 



llVdi 3SIDb3X3/9NI990r 



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S3iavi # 



sniao # 



V3bV OINDId 



(a3AVdNn) SNDIWd 



(a3AVd) 9NI>iaVd 



^IDVb 313X313 



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S3H3N3a 



xiwsais 



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SS333V OiflV 



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lOOd 9N I WW I MS 



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sibnoo Qavoa3iJdnHS 



a3iN30 N0IiV3a33b 



ONnObOAVId 



Siunoo a3n\/M 3sodbnd-innw 



sai3id 3ii3iHiv 3S0dand-innw 



llVai 3SI3b3X3/9NI990r 



WniSVNWA9 



Sibno3 nv9i3>is\/a 



sai3ij iiva3sva 



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S3iavi # 



snib9 # 



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(QSAVdNfl) 9NI>iyVd 



(a3AVd) 9NI>lbVd 



))3V« 313A3ia 



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S313Vid333y HSVUl 



S3H3N39 



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- 


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a3iN33 N0IlV3aD3a 




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sianoo a3nw 3sodand-innw 




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sibno3 nvai3>isva 


i-i 


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X 


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sianoo siNN3i 



lOOd 9NIWWIMS 



;ai3ij 3n9V3i 3iiiii/nv8idos 



si«no3 aa\/oa3idjnHS 



a3iN33 N0Ii\/3b33a 



aNnobOAVid 



siano3 a3nvM 3sodbnd-iiinw 



sai3ij 3ii3iHi\/ 3S0dbnd-innw 



llVbi 3SI3a3X3/9NI990r 



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sibno3 nvai3>is\/a 



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■ swooyis3b 



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siynoo aavoa3ijdnHS 



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•^6- 



Appendix C 
URBAN AREA USER-ORIENTED FACILITYNEEDS ASSESSMENT 



1 













OURTS 
LLEYBALL) 


o 

LU CC 
— 1 LU 


ALLED COURTS 
NDBALL) 






LU 

< 
LU 

— 1 














</i 




oo 


J- C_) 


3 et 






LU 














o 


oo 


> 


o 


3: 






_J 














_i 


—J 


LU 


LU O 


LU 




oo 


H- 


oo 












LU 


H^ 


t/1 " 


OO OO 


tn •< 




LU 


h- OOl h- 












1— t 


<c 


O — i 


o 


o _l 


oo 


—1 


•-■ qI q: 










z 


U- 


cc 


Q 1 


Q_ * 


Q 1 


o 


CO 


_j _i 


=i 










QO 




\- 


CC <X, 


ai _i 


ai ct 


z 


<C 


~-^uJ o 






C5 1- 




LU 1—4 


_l 




ZZi CO 


=D _l 


O CO 


rs 


1— 


_i >— 


<_) 






Z t-> 




»— t— 


_J 


C3 


Q. 1— 


Q- cC 


O- H- 


o 




_JUJ 






»— 1 ►— t 




<c«a: 


<: 


Z 


1 LU 


1 CO 


1 LU 


q: 


<_) 


< 


oo 


oo 




z cc 




21—1 


CO 


1— 1 


t— :s<i 


l-» 1— 


1— 1 :i^ 


o 


1— 1 


CO 


1— 1 


^ 




Z 1- 


C£. 


•-• ra 


LU 


o 


h- on 


— o 


1— o 


>- 


z 


t— 


^ 


(_) 




<C ir> 


< 


^- o- 


oo 


o 


—1 <: 


-J o 


—1 <: 


et 


o 


U- 


z 


cC 




_j •— • 


LU 


CO o 


<x. 


o 


ZD CO 


ID U- 


idq:: 


_l 


1— 1 


o 


LU 


q:: 




Q. Q 


>- 


LU a. 


CO 


o 


s:-— 


z:-- 


s:--^ 


Q- 


Q- 


oo 


t— 


1— 




12 


1983 




2 


_ 


4 


2 


_ 


2 


19 


3 


2 


1 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


3467 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






1990 


4129 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






1995 


4499 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






2000 


4868 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


— 


— 






'lUi'AL 




2 


- 


4 


2 


2 


2 


19 


3 


2 


1 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


13 


1983 




^^ 


^ 


2 


^ 


^ 


1 


17 


1 


.^ 


^, 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


4077 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


"- 






1990 


5208 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






1995 


5778 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






2000 


6347 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 






'lUi'AL 




— 


— 


4 


1 


3 


1 


17 


2 


3 


— 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


14 


1983 




_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


1 


36* 


2 


1 


_ 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


.3898 


- 


1 


7 


3 


6 


2 


- 


2 


5 


- 






1990 


.5796 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 






1995 


L7674 


— 


— 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 






2000 


.9552 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


1 


1 


— 






TOTAL 




- 


1 


13 


5 


9 


4 


39 


6 


9 


- 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


15 


1983 
















34* 








EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


8742 


- 


- 


5 


2 


4 


1 


- 


2 


4 


- 






1990 


L2955 


- 


1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


- 


2 


2 


- 






1995 


L4791 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 






2000 


L6627 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 






TOTAL 






1 


11 


4 


8 


3 


34 


5 


8 




CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 



■47- 



Appendix C 
URBAN AREA USER ORIENTED FACILITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT 



PLANNING 
DISTRICT 


LU 

>- 


ESTIMATED 
POPULATION 


oo 

Q 

_J 
LU 
1— 1 
U. 

_l 
_J 

•a: 

CQ 
LU 
OO 

<c 
oo 


oo 

—J 

C3 

1— 1 

o 
o 
o 


MULTI-PURPOSE COURTS 
(BASKETBALL, VOLLEYBALL) 


MULTI-PURPOSE FIELDS 
(FOOTBALL, SOCCER) 


MULTI-PURPOSE WALLED COURTS 
(RACKETBALL. HANDBALL) 


oo 
o 

■z. 

o 

O 

>- 


oo 

LU 

_l 
CO 

1— 1 

<_> 

1— 1 
Q. 


LU 
O 

•a: 

LU 

_j 

LU 

_J 
1— 
1— OO 

•-4 Q 

—J _J 
^>^LU 
_J 1— < 
-J U- 

ct 
OO 

1— 

Ll_ 
O 
OO 


oo 

h- 
ai 

ID 
O 
C_3 

OO 

1— 1 

■z. 
■z. 

LU 

1— 


oo 

o 
q: 




16 


1983 
1985 
1990 
1995 
2000 

'iUl'AL 


5340 
7095 
8154 
9212 


2 
2 


1 
1 


2 
1 
1 
1 

1 

6 


4 
4 


9 
9 


1 

1 

1 

3 


10 

4 
2 
2 

18 


3 
3 


8 
8 


2 
2 


EXISTING FACILITIES 

CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


17 


1983 
1985 
1990 
1995 
2000 

TOTAL 


812 
1216 
1445 
1674 


- 


- 


1 
1 


"" 


"" 


"" 


1 
1 

1 

3 


^ 


^ 


^ 


EXISTI1SK5 FACILITIES 

CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


18 


1983 
1985 
1990 
1995 
2000 

TOTAL 


6316 
7148 
8263 
9377 


- 


- 


2 
2 

1 

1 

6 


1 
1 

2 


3 

1 

4 


1 

1 
2 


12 
2 
2 
2 

18 


1 
1 

1 
3 


3 

1 

4 


1 
1 


EXISTING FACILITIES 

CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


19 


1983 
1985 
1990 
1995 
2000 

TOTAL 


2319 
2764 
3441 
4117 


- 


- 


1 

1 

2 


1 
1 


1 

1 
2 


1 

1 


4 

1 
1 
2 

8 


1 
1 


1 

1 
2 


- 


EXISTING FACILITIES 

CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 



-48- 



Appendix C 
URBAN AREA USER ORIENTED FACILITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT 

















oo 




























1— 




























Qc: 
























< — » 




^ 
























_j 




o 
























_i 




o^^ 






UI 


















•a: 




_l 






ZD 


















OO CO 


oo 


Q _l 






o 


















»— >- 


Q 


UJ ca: 






cC 


















q: UJ 


_l^ — ^ 


—1 CQ 






UI 


















:z) _j 


UJ Qc: 


_J Q 






_l 


















O _J 


1— 1 UI 


<: z 




















i/> 




o o 


u. o 


3«j: 






UI 














o 


CO 


>■ 


o 


zc 






_J 














_i 


_l 


UJ 


UJ o 


UJ 




Ul 


1— 


CO 












UJ 


1— 1 


CO « 


oo oo 


CO •< 




UI 


H- 1/1 


f— 












1— 1 


< 


O -J 


o 


o_i 


oo 


_J 


•— 1 c 


Qi 










z 


u. 


q: 


Q 1 


Cl. •> 


Q. _J 


Q 


QQ 


_l _ 


ID 










QO 




»— 


OC <Si 


Qi _J 


Q!:«=c 


z 


■a: 


— u 


O 






ej t— 




UJ )— < 


_J 




Z2 CQ 


rj _j 


ZD CQ 


ID 


1— 


1 1— - 


C_) 






z <-> 




h- h- 


_J 


o 


CL. h- 


Q- cC 


Ql H- 


O 




_J u. 








1— 1 I—* 




«c«a: 


«a: 


z 


1 UJ 


1 CO 


1 UI 


q: 


o 


ea: 


CO 


CO 




z Ol 




s:— 1 


OQ 


1— t 


•-I :i<i 


►-• 1— 


i-i i^ 


o 


1— 1 


CQ 


t— < 


i^ 




■z. 1— 


q: 


•-• ID 


UJ 


o 


1— oo 


h- o 


H- O 


>- 


z 


1— 


z 


<_) 




<C CO 


<c 


1— Q- 


OO 


o 


—1 «a: 


_I o 


—1 ct 


<c 


o 


u. 


z 


"=C 




_I •-• 


UJ 


OO O 


<i: 


o 


=> CQ 


=5 Ll_ 


Z> Od 


_j 


1— • 


o 


UI 


oc 




o. o 


>- 


UJ O. 


CO 


•-3 


s:— ' 


2:«-^ 


21— ' 


CL. 


Q_ 


oo 


1— 


y— 




20 


1983 
















_ 


7" 


. 


. 


EXISTIISJG FACILITIES 




1985 


1500 


— 


— 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 






1990 


2140 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 






1995 


2724 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 






2000 


3308 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 






TOTAL 




— 


— 


2 


— 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


— 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


*Pi 


cnic t^ 


bles a 


ire i 


Ln t] 


le I- 


75 wa 


yside 


i pan 


"ks, 


and 


not 


readily accessible to 


ai 


~ea resi 


dents. 

























-49- 



Appendix C 
RURAL AREA USER ORIENTED FACIUTY NEEDS ASSESSMENT 













RTS 
EYBALL) 


C/O 

Q 


LED COURTS 
BALL) 






LU 
LU 


















O—l 


LU C^ 
1— 1 LU 


_J Q 






_J 














oo 




OO 


Ll_ tJ 


3 ct 






LU 














o 


I/) 


>- 


CJ 


IC 






1 














_j 


_l 


LU 


LU O 


LU 




OO 


1— 


CO 












LU 


t— 1 


CO •> 


C/^ OO 


OO •« 




LU 


1— on 


1— 












t— 1 


<c 


O —I 


O 


0_J 


OO 


_J 


•— • a 


ca 










z 


U. 


Qc: 


Q 1 


Q. •> 


Q. _l 


o 


CO 


1 


:3 










QO 




1— 


cx: < 


QC _) 


C£. ct 


z: 


ct 


"■^LU 


o 






O h- 




LU •— 1 


_l 




ID OQ 


^ -J 


=) CO 


ID 


h- 


1 l-H 


(_> 






Z (-> 




»— »— 


-J 


CD 


a. 1— 


D- «C 


Q- H- 


o 




_J Ll. 








t— 1 •— 1 




<cca: 


<c 


Z 


1 LU 


1 QQ 


1 LU 


q: 


<_) 


ct 


OO 


OO 




z ct: 




s: —1 


QQ 


1— 1 


H-l S<i 


•-♦ (- 


•-I i^ 


o 


1— 1 


CO 


►—1 


i^ 




z 1— 


o:: 


•-• Z2 


LU 


tD 


1— OO 


h- O 


»— CJ 


>- 


z 


t— 


■z. 


C_3 




<C oo 


<c 


1— Q. 


oo 


O 


—1 eC 


_J O 


—I cC 


ct 


tJ 


Li_ 


z 


<t 




_i •— I 


UJ 


CO O 


<c 


O 


=3 CO 


Z3 U. 


IDQC 


_l 


H-« 


o 


LU 


cc 




o. o 


>- 


LU O. 


CO 


•n 


s:*-' 


z:-— 


S— - 


O- 


D_ 


OO 


1— 


1— 




21 


1983 




1 


_ 


16 


3 


4 


7 


123 


8 


14 


1 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


L4995 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


- 


— 


— 


1 






1990 


.7765 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 






1995 


20123 


- 


- 


— 


- 


2 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 






2000 


22725 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






TOTAL 




1 


— 


16 


6 


11 


7 


123 


8 


14 


2 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


22 


1983 




^ 


^ 


4 


_ 


. 


3 


12 


2 


T 


. 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


6712 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


1 


- 


3 


- 






1990 


8136 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


3 


- 


1 


- 






1995 


9242 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


- 






2000 


L0345 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


- 


1 


- 






TOTAL 




- 


- 


6 


2 


5 


5 


20 


3 


5 


- 




23 


1983 




1 


_ 


4 


2 


_ 


1 


41 


2 




_ 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


5774 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 






1990 


6936 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 




- 


- 


1 


- 






1995 


7808 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 






2000 


8677 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 






TOTAL 


8677 


1 


- 


5 


2 


4 


2 


41 


2 


4 


1 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 


24 


1983 








1 


_ 


^ 


3 


67 


1 


1 


^ 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


2795 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






1990 


3378 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






1995 


3785 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






2000 


4190 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 






TOTAL 




- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


3 


67 


1 


2 


1 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 



























■5C- 



Appendix C 
RURAL AREA USER ORIENTED FACILITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT 

















CO 




























1— 




























a: 
























, — » 




=3 
























_J 




O 
























_) 




C_> — 






LU 


















<: 




_J 






Z3 


















LTi CO 


t/1 


Q _J 






C3 


















1— >- 


Q 


LU CC 






•a: 


















q: uj 


_l -- — 


_l CO 






LU 


















Z3 -J 


LU O^ 


_l Q 






_J 


















O _J 


)— 1 LU 


< z: 




















in 




o o 


u_ o 


3 cC 






LU 














Q 


oo 


>• 


o 


in 






—I 














_J 


_l 


LU 


LU O 


LU 




CO 


1— 


CO 












LU 


(— t 


CO •> 


OO CyO 


CO « 




LU 


1— C/1 


H- 












l—t 


<x. 


O —I 


O 


O —I 


CO 


_I 


•— 1 Q 


q: 










z 


u. 


oc 


Q 1 


Q_ •> 


Q 1 


Q 


CQ 


-J — 


=> 










QO 




\— 


ai <x. 


Qi _l 


ai en 


z 


«a: 


"«>* Lu 


o 






CJ h- 




LU •— I 


_I 




ID CO 


Z3 —1 


ID CO 


rD 


h- 


_l t— 


<_> 






z: <-> 




h- 1— 


_J 


o 


O. I— 


Q- et 


Q. 1— 


o 




_J Ll. 








t—i »— « 




<c*x 


< 


z 


1 LU 


1 CO 


1 LU 


oc 


o 


<: 


CO 


CO 




Z QC 




s: —1 


CO 


(—1 


i-i :xi 


•-♦ 1— 


>-> i^ 


o 


1— • 


00 


1—1 


^ 




Z h— 


q: 


•— < ZD 


UJ 


o 


h- oo 


1— o 


1— o 


>- 


z 


h- 


z 


C_) 




<t oo 


<c 


h- Q- 


oo 


o 


-J cC 


_J o 


_l cC 


<c 


C_) 


U- 


z 


<a: 




_J •— • 


LiJ 


oo o 


<: 


o 


r3 CO 


ZD Ll_ 


=>q: 


_J 


1-^ 


o 


LU 


q: 




Ol Q 


>- 


ui a. 


CQ 


■-3 


z:--- 


21^^ 


s:--' 


o. 


O- 


CO 


1— 


1— 




25 


1983 




1 




6 


3 


2 


5 


21 


6 


4 


1 


EXISTING FACILITIES 




1985 


13925 


- 


- 


3 


- 


4 


1 


6 


- 


2 


- 






1990 


16679 


- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


- 


6 


- 


2 


- 






1995 


19170 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


5 


- 


1 


- 






2000 


21429 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


4 


1 


1 


- 






TOTAL 




1 




14 


6 


10 


6 


42 


7 


10 


1 


CUMULATIVE FACILITIES 
BY 2000 































-51- 



Appendix D 

OPEN SPACE INVENTORY 
URBAN AREA 



TYPt; OF 
OPEN SPACE 


FUNCTION 


APPROXimTE 
SITE SIZE 


OTILITY 


Resource Lands 


Lakes See Aj^)endix E 






University of Fla. 
Institute of Food 
& Agricultural 
Science Tiand 


644 


Acres 




Flood Control 
and Drainage 


100 Yr. Flood Plain 

* 


3315 


Acres 






Drainage Ditches S 
of 53rd Ave 


2. 


4 Miles 


GEIEEN 


Protected Areas 


Devil's Millhopper 


62. 


8 Acres 






. Paynes Prairie 


See 
Area 


Rural 
Inventory 






San Felasco State 
Preserve 


See 
Area 


Rural 
Inventory 




Urban Park Areas 


Ironwood Golf Course 
N.E 39th Ave.. 


132. 


4 Acres 






Kanapaha Botanical 

Gardens 

S. W. 63rd Blvd. 


62 


Acres 






Santa Fe Zoo 
N.W. 83rd St. 


10 


Acres 




• 


Gainesville Golf & 
Country Club 
S.W. 35th Way 


182 


Acres 






Woods ide Racquet Club 
Millhopper Rd. 


10 


Acres 






Buchholz High School 


40 


Acres 






Ft. Clarke Middle School 


48 


Acres 






Oak Hall High School 


19 


Acres 






Terwilliger Elementary 


15 


Acres 






Idylwild Elementary 


12 


Acres 






Prairie View Elementary 


20 


Acres 



■52- 



1 



TYPE OF 
OPEN SPACE 



FUNCTION 



SITE 



APPR3XIMA.TE 
SIZE 



Urban Development 



Eastside High School 45 Acres 

Gainesville Golf 9 Acres 
Diiving Range 

N. Fla. Regional Hospital 23 Acres 



Pond east of N. Pla. 
Regional Hospital 

Nationwide Insurance 



3 Acres 
2.4 Acres 



MULTI-USE 



CORRIDOR 



Ri^t of Way 



Scenic 



Boulware Springs 

Bivens Arm 

Santa Pe Comm. College 

Transmission Lines 

Railroad Rigjit of Ways 

Kanapaha Cemetery Rd. 

S.W. 17th Terrace and 
S.W. 56th Avenue 

Millhopper Road 



31 .25 Acres 

28.3 Acres 

183 Acr^s 

55 Miles 

12 Miles 

.75 Miles 

2.2 Miles 
4.5 Miles 



1 






OPEN SPACE INVENTORY 
RURAL AREA 



TYPE OF 
OPEN SPACE 


FUNCTION 


SITE 


APPROXIMATE 
SIZE 


OTILITY 


Flood Control 
and Drainage 


100 Year Flood Plain 






GREEN 


Protected Areas Paynes Prairie 


18,036 


Acres 






San Felasco State 
Preserve 


6,000 


Acres 






Austin Cary Forest 


2,075 


Acres 






Lochloosa Wildlife 
Management Area 


31,000 


Acres 


> 




Oleno State Park 


3,000 


Acres 






Marjorie Kinnan 
Rawlings Home 


6.5 


Acres 


9 

CORRIDOR 


Scenic 


Old Bellamy Road 


6.25 


Miles 


MULTI-USE 




Santa Fe River 


37 


Miles 






Lakes 
(See Appendix E for listing) 

TOTAL RURAL AND URBAN 


30,514 


Acres 


95,479.65 Acres 








120.1 


Miles 



-5^- 









Appendix E 










LAKE INVENTORY 








Nunber 


Naine 


Locaticn 


A< 
4 


:ares 




1 


Santa Fe 


North of Melrose 


,349 




2 


Little Santa Fe 


North of Lake (1) 


1 


rl47 


v 


3 


Hickory Pcnd 


West of lake (2) 




79 


1 


4 


Alto 


East of Waldo 




563 




5 


Cooter Pond 


North central part of county 




306 




6 


Elizabeth 


SoutJi(\7est of Melrose 




141 


1 


7 


Clearwater 


Southeast of Melrose 








8 


Havthome 


HdMthome 




86 




9 


Little Orange 


Southeast of Hatwthome 




596 




10 


Unnamed 


South of lake (9) 




123 




11 


Moss Lee 


Southeast of lake (10) 




141 




12 


Jeffords 


South of HasArt±iome 




210 




13 


Still Pond 


East of Lochloosa 








14 


Tochloosa 


Southeast part of county 


6 


,138 




15 


Orange 


Southeast part of county 


7 


,672 




16 


Palatka 


South of lake (17) 




62 




17 


Newnans 


East of Gainesville 


6 


,331 




18 


Miz.e 


Northeast of Gainesville 




2 




19 


Trout 


Southeast of Gainesville 




37 


1 


20 


Meta 


Northwest Gainesville 




10 




21 


Bivens Arm 


South Gainesville 




173 




22 


Clear 


Southwest Gainesville 




11 




23 


Alice 


University of Florida 




91 




24 


Kanapaha 


Southwest of Gainesville 




208 




25 


Watermelon Pond 


South of Nevbeiry 


1 


,562 




26 


Long Pond 


Southeast of Archer 








27 


Burnt Pond 


West of lake (28) 




57 




28 


Wauberg 


Northwest of Micanopy 




255 




29 


Tuscawilla 


South of Micanopy 




158 


i 


30 


Unnamed Lake 


West of lake (22) 




6 


1 






TOTAL ACRES 


30 


,514 















-55- 



Figure H 
ALACHUA COUNTY LAKES 



Union County 




ntv 



. »;«. 



Appendix F 
ADDITIONAL RECREATIONAL AND OPEN SPACE FACILITIES 



In addition to the recreational and 


open space facilities described in the 


Inventories, the folloving 


facilities may provide other opportunities for the 1 


recreational enjoyiient of Alachua 


County 


residents. 


Aquariiims 




• 


Horseshoe Courts 


Arboretunis 






Libraries 


Archery /Target Ranges 






Martial Arts Establishments 


Arenas and Coliseums 






Minature Golf Courses 


Autaibbile Race Trades 






Model Airplane Areas 


Biking Trails 






Model Boating Paids 


Billiard Parlors 






Museums 


Botanical Gardens 






Nature Centers 


Bcwling Alleys 






Private ;^>artment Facilities 


Boys' Club Facilities 






Private School Facilities 


Bey Scouts' Facilities 






Racquet Clubs 


Canpgrounds 






Rodeo Arenas /Corrals 


Canoe Outposts 






Roller Skating Rinks 


Day Canps 




■ 


Scenic Overlooks 


Fairgrounds 






Skeet/Trap Shooting Ranges 


Fish Canps 






Stables 


Fishing Piers 






Stadiums 


Girl Scouts' Facilities 






Swinming Pools 


Golf Courses 






Theaters 


Golf Driving Ranges 






Video Game Roans 


Health Clubs 






Wildlife Preserves 


Horse Riding Showgrounds 






Zoological Parks 





Appendix G 
Figure I 

NEIGHBORHOOD PARK 











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Play, 



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SCHOOL 



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9o 






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-58- 



Figure J 



COMMUNITY PARK 





i 





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EH m 



EHES 



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-59- 



Figure K 



URBAN DISTRICT PARK 



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■60- 



Figure L 
REGIONAL PARK 



I 
I 




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GLOSSARY 



1. Active Recreation 

Active Recreaticn is any recreaticMial activity requiring the active 
(physical) participation of the person involved (e.g. playing tennis). 

2. Cairnunity Park 

A CoTfiunity Park is a moderately sized park serving 4-6 nei^-iborhoods or an 
entire small city. Its purposes are to provide open space to ccrtplorient 
the urban area and to provide user-oriented recreational facilities for the 
irtmediately surrounding urban area. 

The pcirks should serve a papulation not in excess of 50,000 within a 3 mile 
radius. The land area standard is 2 acres per 1000 people and park sizes 
usually range fron 20 to 100 acres. The parks are often located adjacent 
to middle schools or hi^ schools on collectors or arterials. Access to 
these parks is by mass transit, automobile, bicycle, or walking. 

The parks provide a wide range of user-oriented recreaticaial facilities for 
individual and family needs. There are few resource-based recreaticaial 
opportunities. The parks are equipped with the necessary infrastructure to 
support their carrying capacities and proper landscaping or fencing 
provides a buffer zone at the park's perimeter. 

3. Leisure 

Leisure is any portion of an individual's time not occupied by gainful 
enplcyment or used in the pursuit of essential activities. 

4. Mini-Park 

A Mini-Park is a small tract of land serving the recreational needs of the 
iitrnediate urban vicinity. 

The parks serve an estittated population not in excess of 2500 within a 1/4 
mile radius. Park sizes are variable d^)ending on the land available and 
the needs of the iitmediate area. They are usually located asvay from 
congested areas and are pedestrian oriented. 

The parks may provide passive user-oriented recreaticxial opportunities 
(benches, picnic tables) or active user-oriented recreational opportunities 
(playground, tennis courts). Special attention is focused on the needs of 
the preschool and senior citizen age groups. Lighting may be provided, but 
infrastructure is minimal. 

5. Nei^borhood Park 

A Nei^borhood Park is a local park primarily serving the surrounding 
neighborhood. Its purposes are to provide op&\ space within the 
residential area and to provide user-oriented recreaticaial facilities to 
satisfy the unique needs of the neighborhood. 



■62- 



I 
I 
I 
I 
i 
I 

li 

I 
I 
I 

i 
i 



The parks should serve an estimated pcpulatiOTi not in excess of 10,000 
within a 1/2 mile radius. The land area standard is 2 acares per 1000 
people and park sizes usually range from 5-20 acres. The parks are often 
located adjacent to elanentary sdiools and a!ivay from heavy traffic. Access 
to these parks is by autcrobile, bicycle, or walking; but it is primarily 
pedestrian oriented. 

The parks provide user-oriented recreaticaial opportunities that reflect the 
needs and character of the surrounding nei<^borhood. Special attention is 
focused on the needs of the presc±iool, school age, and senior citizen age 
groups. The parks are equipped with the necessary infrastructure to 
support their carrying capacities and proper landscaping or fencing 
provides a buffer zone at the park's perimeter. 

6. Open Space 

Open Space is open land, water, or air devoted to recreaticxial, leisure, 
preservaticxi, or non-urban uses that provides unobstructed pJiysical 
movement and that is relatively free of man-iTBde structural objects. 

7. PcLSsive Recreaticai 

Passive Recreaticai is any recreational activity that does not require the 
active (physical) participaticn of the person involved (e.g. watching a 
Softball game). 

8. Recreation 

RecreaticHi is ar^ creative use of leisure time v^iicfh ocaitributes 
significantly to the quality of an individual's life. Reacquainting 
cxieself with nature, participating in a sport or craft or just enjoying a 
tenporary release from the routine datands of life allows many people to 
feel refreshed and creates a personal feeling of fulfillment. These 
pleasurable experiences contribute to the effective functicHiing of eadi 
individual's total life. 

^* Regional Park 

A Regional Park is a large resource based tract of land or water located at 
the periphery of urban eireas or in a rureil setting. Its purposes are to 
preserve the natural resources of the region, provide for open space to 
catplement the urban environment, and si^plement the recreational 
facilities of urbcin areas. 

The parks should serve a population in excess of 100,000 in a multi-county 
regicn within one hour's driving distance. The land area standard is 
twenty acres per 1000 people and park sizes usually range from 250 to 
thousands of acres. Access to these parks is usually by automobile. 

The parks primarily provide resource-based types of outdoor recreation, but 
they also may provide limited user-oriented facilities. The parks are 
equipped with the necessary infrastructure to support their carrying 
capacities . 



-63- 



10. Resource-Based Recreation 

Resource-Based Recreation is any recreational activity v^ere location is 
dependent c«i sane particular elortent or ocnibination of elements in the 
natural envirconent. Exanples of resource-based recreaticffi are as follows: 

Boating Picnicking 

Canping Ssviinning (Lake) 

Diving Trail Bike Riding 

Fishing Tubing 

Hiking Visiting Arc±ieological or 

Horseback Riding Historical Sites 

Hunting Water Skiing 

Nature Study 

11. Semi-Public Facility 

A Senii-Public Facility is a recreational area accessible to the general 
population on a membership basis only. Membership qualification can be 
based on a fee (private club), on residence locaticn (subdivision 
cluthouse), on status and fee (University of Florida facilities), or on 
other methods of limiting or specifying a facility's users. 

12. Special-Use Facility 

A Special-Use Facility is a recreational area designed to serve one primary 
functicxi, such as a boat ranp, a football stadium, or a golf course. These 
facilities are normally located en sites v^^ich only provide enou<^ space 
for the single use. 

13. Urban District Park 

An Urban District Park is a relatively large tract of land or water located 
within or at the periphery of an urban area. Its purposes are to preserve 
the natural resources of the area, provide for open space to corplement the 
urban environment, and provide both resource-based and user-oriented 
recreation to the immediate metropolitan area. 

The parks should serve a population in excess of 50,000 in several 
comunities, a city, or a county within 40 minute's driving distance. The 
land area standard is 5 acres per 1000 people and park sizes usually range 
from 100 to hundreds of acres. Access to these parks is by mass transit or 
automobile via a major highi»/ay. 

The parks provide a balaince of both resource-based and user-oriented 
recreational opportunities. They are equipped with the necessary 
infrastructure to support their carrying capacities. 



-64- 



II 
I 



14. User-Oriented Recreation 

User-Oriented Recreation is any recreational activity that can be provided 
alinost anywhere for the convenience of the user. Exaitples of user-oriented 
recreation are as follows: 

Ardiery Playground 

Bicycling Swiimdng (Pool) 

Baseball Racquetball 

Basketball Shuffleboard 

Bailing Soccer 

Football Softball 

Golf Tennis 

Gyrmastics Track and Field 

Handball Volleyball 
Jogging/Exercise Trails Wei^t lifting 
Picnicking 



M 



-65- 



POOTOOTES 

Alacihua County Department of Planning and Developnent; Future Land Use 
2000 ; Second Draft; April, 1983, p. 10. 

National Recreation and Pcirk Association; Recreaticai, Park, and Open 
Space Standcirds and Guidelines ; Washington, D.C., 1983 

Seymour M. Gold; "Recreation Space, Services, and Facilities, " Chapter 
10 of The Practice of Local Government Planning ; Intergovernmental City 
Management Association, 1979, p. 278 

^bid. p. 279. 

^ Ibid. 

division of Land Management, Department of the Interior, "Where to 
Build" Technical Bulletin #1 in Joseph DeChiara and Lee Kcppelman. Urban 
Planning and Design Criteria. Third Edition, New York, 1982. 



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